Hypothyroidism is a form of autoimmune disease. It can come from leaky gut or from other factors. Make sure to take care of your thyroid and get tested if you think your keto hair loss could actually be from thyroid issues. On top of taking care of your thyroid, you can improve your hair with vitamins, minerals and foods rich in biotin, zinc, iron, magnesium, vitamin B12 and vitamin E.
Nearly any big change in dietary habits brings some changes. For me after years on vegetarian then vegan diet my hair was thin and fell out, my skin was very dry, had dark circles under my eyes. After a few months on very low carb my hair and skin dramatically improved, and my long time peeling fingernails got stronge. I believe lack of iron was major contributor.
We've read around and it seems like it could be any number of things. Our current plan is to bump up green vegetables (like spinach, kale, and brocolli) and to add more protein (we're wondering if she hit fat too hard and protein too little). We're also considering swapping the vitamins to add Biotin into the mix because it seems to have fantastic hair and nail reviews.
I suspect ketosis never actually occurred for you. The initial burst of energy of the excited placebo effect. The steady decline from there was starvation. Your skin cleared up because you dropped processed foods from your diet. The illness you felt later into the experiment was a result of malnutrition, as was your increased symptoms of hypothyroidism. Then when you got the actual flu, your decreased immune system as a result of the above was the culprit.
Fortunately, the hair loss that is caused by telogen effluvium is usually only temporary. Because the hair follicles have not suffered any permanent damage, we can normally recover about 90% of the hair lost with a single TE episode and the old cycle of hair growth will usually restore itself once the physical or emotional stress is relieved. However, I would definitely recommend that you have your hair loss closely examined by a doctor who has experience treating women’s hair loss. Common genetic pattern baldness progresses differently in women than it does in men, and there are also several other potential causes of hair loss, ranging from hormonal imbalances to rare auto-immune disorders, that may also be involved and which can be difficult to diagnose. What seems to be stress-caused hair loss may actually be something else entirely and only an experienced doctor can pair you with a treatment method best suited to your individual needs.
I too tested normal with my thyroid. However my temperature in the mornings has been very low. For example my temperature for the past three mornings were 97.5 97.2 and 96.6. I have all the classic symptoms of a thyroid disorder. My hair started falling out suddenly 5 months ago and I have lost more than half of it. (By the way I’m a 21 year old girl). I need sleep all of the time and I’m always cold not wanting the air conditioner to ever cut on while others are burning hot. I’m also depressed. My life used to be completely different. I’m actually on the way to a doctor who does think I have a thyroid problem and wants to help me. ( all other doctors just think I have telogen effluvium) I hope this doctor can help me the way you helped your patients because I really suspect this to be a thyroid problem and not just a hair loss problem.
Anemia, recovering from childbirth and the after-effects of surgery can cause temporary hair shedding, too. If your hair stops growing altogether and is leaving you with bald patches, consult with your doctor or dermatologist. Sometimes you can stop this loss with something as simple as changing hairstyles or hair-care products. In other cases, your loss could be hereditary or due to an overactive immune system.
Thank you so much for all your great advise and information. I was wondering what should I be looking for to slow down hair loss as a postmenopausal women. I am having a Biote pellet (for hormones) inserted every three months and they have me on additional Iodone 12.5mg, which has Zinc 10 mg, Selenium 200mcg, and Potassium 1.2 mg. I take Naturethroid for my hypothyroid, and have started using the Betaine/Pepsin (which has made a huge difference in the way I digest food!) I eat a modified keto diet (usually lower carb morning and lunch with some starch carbs at dinner. Gluten free as well. My hair used to be so thick and is now so much thinner with handfuls coming out every shower. I’d love to hear your advise.

Thanks for reading Joy. It’s hard for me to give hard-lined recommendations without more information about your physical activity level, typical calories consumed while outside of ketosis, etc. The hair loss you’re experiencing is most likely the result of a calorie deficit, which when coupled with a ketogenic diet, can exacerbate hypothyroidism and lead to the typical thinning pattern we see in women. I’d suggest increasing your calorie intake first while trying to stay in ketosis. And if that doesn’t improve your hair loss symptoms, then I’d suggest maybe trying a non-ketogenic diet — or a diet that only puts you in ketosis for short periods of time (for instance, once weekly intermittent fasting).
Heather- Not everyone will need every single supplement! In fact, I believe that most nutrients should come from the diet, this is why I always list food sources for most of the nutrients, vitamins, minerals and probiotics that are depleted in Hashimoto’s in the book and on the blog. However, some may require/prefer supplements and the supplements on the website are a resource for those that do. I recommend getting tested for deficiencies to determine your need for a supplement as instructed in the book and blog. I also don’t recommend starting multiple supplements all at once. I recommend starting one at a time and then adding another a week or so later once it has been confirmed that the first supplement is not causing any harm.
Several studies suggest that carbohydrates totaled 30-40% of paleolithic peoples’ daily caloric intake. And for those consuming fewer than 20% of total calories from carbohydrates, it was because they lived furthest from the equator – where fewer fruits grew. And guess what? That 20% carbohydrate threshold is still two-fold higher than what many “ketogenic paleo dieters” aim for today (around 10% of total calories).
Furthermore, I’m under no obligation to disclose publicly each reader’s exact regrowth methods. That information is reserved for readers who financially support the site via book purchases. As long as a reader’s methods fit within the natural claims of my site, and I have permission to use their photos, there’s nothing misleading or unclear about me posting their photos.
Regarding the ferritin levels, mine fell to 8. They did five infusions of iron and got it to around 270. It has dropped to 170. I don’t feel as good as I did, and my hair is falling out again. Please explain to me the formula you use on proper ferritin levels so I might talk about with the hematologist about optimum levels for my hair. They think I’m fine at 170. I weigh 212. What should my optimum ferritin level be for my Hashimoto’s? Thanks.
My iron and ferritin levels are in the “normal range” (53 and 29 ng/ml), but my transferrin levels are high (318) and my transferrin saturation low (11.8%). My GP recommended an iron supplement (40mg/day), would you recommend the same? I don’t experience extreme hair loss, but extremely dry hair and skin, low energy and weight gain. Thanks so much! Elisabeth
Hi Lorena, the shampoo I took a picture of is from a local business in Thailand and I don’t think they sell this in the US. When looking online I haven’t found one as good in the states, but I’m sure there is a local business or 2 that make a nice natural shampoo similar to this one. I hope so at least. I posted it so you can see the ingredients. I wish you luck on the search!
I suspect ketosis never actually occurred for you. The initial burst of energy of the excited placebo effect. The steady decline from there was starvation. Your skin cleared up because you dropped processed foods from your diet. The illness you felt later into the experiment was a result of malnutrition, as was your increased symptoms of hypothyroidism. Then when you got the actual flu, your decreased immune system as a result of the above was the culprit.
I ramped up my exercise on my carb load weekends, and still kept a goal to stay under 100g of carbs a day, just so I wouldn't go overboard. I got to have my enchiladas, pizza, Pho with real noodles, but within moderation. That got me back to my goal weight and is helping me maintain it now. Of course you will have days where you go to a party and there's cake or something on a weekend, or you have a bad stress/period related food craving day but as long as you maintain the exercise and being good with keto during the week, you should be solid!
Hair loss is usually slightly delayed from the actual incident that caused it, on the scale of 2-3 months, so if your GF have been on keto for ~6 month's the problem (stress, nutrient deficiency) probably started about halfway through it and you're noticing it now as a lot of hairs are going from a telogen to exogen phase. It might also be that she's fixed the problem since then but she will probably still lose (a variable amount of) hair due to how it grows in cycles and depending on how severe/long the initial stress/deficiency was. 

Once you know all of your thyroid levels, you can work with your doctor to make sure that you’re on the right type and dose of supplemental thyroid hormone. Free T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, plays a big role in the health of your hair, yet the most commonly prescribed supplemental thyroid hormone is a T4-only hormone, such as Synthroid® or Levoxyl®. Many thyroid patients have difficulty converting T4, the storage form of the hormone, to Free T3, and do better on natural desiccated thyroid hormone, such as Armour® or Naturethroid®, which includes both T4 and T3, or by adding in a T3-only form of supplemental thyroid hormone, such as Cytomel® or a compounded time-release T3 formula. I discuss in detail all of the different forms of supplemental thyroid hormone and how to determine which one is right for you, in my book, The Thyroid Connection.

Monica – thank you for sharing your journey! Most people feel best with a TSH of around 1 or lower and with a Free T4 and Free T3 in the upper half of the range. It is expected that your TSH will be very suppressed when optimal on NDT medication. How much thyroid replacement therapy is needed is unique and different for each person, so it’s important to work with a functional medicine practitioner or a doctor, who can closely monitor your dosage and your progress.Every six weeks is usually a good schedule for testing your thyroid hormones.
Becky – Thank you for following this page. Please, understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to answer specific medical questions, but I highly recommend that you work with a functional medicine clinician. It’s an entire medical specialty dedicated to finding and treating underlying causes and prevention of serious chronic disease rather than disease symptoms
I too tested normal with my thyroid. However my temperature in the mornings has been very low. For example my temperature for the past three mornings were 97.5 97.2 and 96.6. I have all the classic symptoms of a thyroid disorder. My hair started falling out suddenly 5 months ago and I have lost more than half of it. (By the way I’m a 21 year old girl). I need sleep all of the time and I’m always cold not wanting the air conditioner to ever cut on while others are burning hot. I’m also depressed. My life used to be completely different. I’m actually on the way to a doctor who does think I have a thyroid problem and wants to help me. ( all other doctors just think I have telogen effluvium) I hope this doctor can help me the way you helped your patients because I really suspect this to be a thyroid problem and not just a hair loss problem.

Rapid or irregular heartbeat – Your heart may feel like it’s pounding, and you may have trembling in your hands and fingers. You may also sweat more. Anxiety or irritability – A fast metabolism may make you feel nervous, anxious or irritable. Fewer or lighter periods – Women with hyperthyroidism may have fewer or lighter menstrual periods, potentially affecting ovulation and leading to infertility. Thyroid trouble may also lead to low sex drive or miscarriage.
Nutrient deficiencies are an issue for me personally. I supplement every day to maintain my nutrients at optimum. When I noticed a worsening of my hair loss last year, nutrient testing revealed that I was deficient in all those nutrients necessary for hair health. This high quality multivitamin Pure Encapsulations PureLean Pure Pack (it helped me lose a few pounds too) which includes the healthy fat omega-3 has made a world of difference. I also like Pure Encapsulations Energize Plus Pure Pack for a boost of energy but it often sells out.
Becky – Thank you for following this page. Please, understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to answer specific medical questions, but I highly recommend that you work with a functional medicine clinician. It’s an entire medical specialty dedicated to finding and treating underlying causes and prevention of serious chronic disease rather than disease symptoms
Sudden weight loss is a form of physical trauma that can result in thinning hair. This could happen even if the weight loss is ultimately good for you. It’s possible that the weight loss itself is stressing your body or that not eating right can result in vitamin or mineral deficiencies. Loss of hair along with noticeable weight loss may also be a sign of an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia.
Hey Praz – I tend to agree. Anything that chronically elevates cortisol (for instance, stress) can increase hair shedding. And that increase in cortisol can manifest into heart disease, a compromised microbiome, autoimmunity, hair loss, and thousands of other conditions depending on the individual. Just as you mention, everyone’s body processes stress in different ways.
Cindie- Thank you so much for your support. I’m looking forward to hearing your progress on this page. Make sure to take the book slow, take notes, highlight, and establish a baseline when making changes. You may be interested in my 12 week online program called Hacking Hashimoto’s that covers all of the strategies that I go through with my one-on-one clients, in a self-paced format, so that participants have access to all of the things I’ve learned about Hashimoto’s without having to schedule costly consults with me or another practitioner. There are a few requirements that you should pay attention to, such as my book is a required read.

The life of a single hair has four separate stages. The anogen phase, when your hair is actively growing, usually lasts between two and seven years. The short 10-day catagen phase is when the hair follicle shrinks and growth halts. Next is the telogen phase during which the hair rests for about three months; it stays attached to your head, but a new growth begins underneath it. The final phase is the exogen phase in which the hair finally detaches from your body and is shed. About 10 to 20 percent of your hair is in the telogen stage at any given time, while the rest is actively growing, according to the American Hair Loss Association.


Hi Raviteja, I’m not sure what you’re taking 25 mcg of, T4 or T3. In either case, taking thyroid medicine could cause your TSH to be low which could make it look like you have hyperthyroidism. On the other hand, a low body temperature could explain hair loss. http://www.wilsonssyndrome.com/ebook/signs-and-symptoms-and-how-they-made-the-list/dry-hair-hair-loss/
I’m 31, Diagnosed with PCOS 6 years ago and have been battling hair loss for almost 5 years now. My thyroid tests are normal every time it gets checked. My Iron is just fine. Since all I’ve seen are lousy endocrinologists, I continue on with hair loss and thinning. No doctor can find out whats going on or if its the PCOS or fails to see it as an issue. I’m at a complete loss for help as my Insecurity about hair keeps growing. I have found that using Nioxin hair products help it to look thicker but does not stop it from falling out. Any suggestions would be appreciated…. wasting my money on seeing more doctors would be my last resort.
Please note that in January 2016 the Endocrine News published this article January 2016: Thyroid Month: Beware of Biotin which stated that taking biotin supplements could cause falsely high and falsely low results in a variety of laboratory tests, including thyroid lab tests because biotin interferes with the test platform used for particular laboratory tests. If you are taking biotin and your thyroid lab results begin to change and not make sense in terms of your clinical symptoms speak with your doctor about doing a retest of your thyroid labs after several days of discontinuing your biotin supplement to be sure there is no interference.

The thyroid is part of the endocrine system and is frequently referred to as a butterfly shaped gland. Situated in the lower neck just below the Adam's apple and wrapped around the windpipe, it is composed of two lobes surrounding the isthmus (the bridge between both lobes). Each lobe preforms the same function, and like the kidneys can take over the work load should anything go wrong with the other lobe. Though small in size, weighing approximately 1oz, it plays a vital role in body function as it affects every cell in the body.
Besides that, an underactive thyroid gland affects the way your body breaks down the proteins that you eat on a daily basis. This is important in the growth of hair because the hair germinates from the proteins. Additionally, in this condition, your stomach acid levels drop and in this case, you will not be able to absorb and make use of the minerals and vitamins that are important for your hair growth.
Isn't it frustrating how many doctors just don't test for antibodies? I almost think it would be the first thing you'd test for, rather than TSH. But even my endocrinologist had nothing to say about it, just said "Oh when your thyroid fails we'll give you medication." I started doing my own research and found out about the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first time I've been able to lose weight for over ten years.
I eat egg with whites in the morning with some avocado and pink salt. Banana or apple. Chicken breast salad with romaine lettuce and yogurt dressing. Sometimes chocolate chips. I love snacking on them throughout the day. Carrots, veggies, workout for an hour. Then eat an apple. Dinner is either another chicken salad with extra veggies or chicken veggies and roasted sweet potatoes. Then dessert is either popcorn using olive or virgin coconut oil or my frozen chocolate plant protein almond milk. Sometimes plain greek yogurt with frozen blueberries and a tbsp of strawberry jam. I don’t do cookies, breads, rice, cake, or ice cream. I don’t really like them. The only sweet junk i like is semi sweet or bitter or dark chocolate.
There I was, standing in front of my bathroom mirror brushing my hair, when I noticed chunks of it coming out on my hair brush. It was horrifying and depressing, after all I was 32 years old and this was not normal! I would later discover that this was a symptom of my Graves’ Disease, and I would even have the misfortune of experiencing it again during my thyroid treatment. While thyroid hair loss might not be one of the more dangerous symptoms of thyroid dysfunction, it can be one of the more disheartening, and it was a constant reminder that something was not right with my body.
Low ferritin (the stored form of iron) is one of the most common causes of hair loss in women. Given low ferritin is also a common problem for hypothyroid people, it is important to have iron testing including ferritin especially if you are experiencing hair loss. It is not enough to be told by your doctor that your iron levels are ‘normal’. Ferritin levels are not always tested. Get a copy of your lab results and be sure ferritin has been specifically tested. Even if ferritin is within the ‘normal’ range that doesn’t make it ‘optimal’.
In my personal opinion, I’d much rather eat too much protein (and get kicked out of ketosis), than eat too little and suffer the consequences from protein deficiency. How much protein should you eat? Opinions vary, but on average you should have at least 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight. 90 grams of protein for a person who weighs 180 would be a safe number almost on the high side (we don’t need as much protein as we think).
“For hair loss, I routinely recommend multiple vitamins, and especially evening primrose oil. If there’s any sex pattern to it — if a woman is losing hair in partly a male pattern – -then, the problem is there is excessive conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) at the level of the hair follicle. Evening primrose oil is an inhibitor of that conversion. So almost anybody with hair loss probably will benefit from evening primrose oil.”
It’s well established that hair loss can be related to emotional stress or anxiety. There’s usually about a 3 month delay between the stressful event or time period and your hair falling out. Unless there’s another underlying medical reason for your hair loss, it should only last for as long as you’re going through that particular period of stress or anxiety.
Hair can be considered a barometer of health because hair cells are some of the fastest growing in the body. When the body is in crisis, the hair cells can shut down to redirect energy elsewhere. The types of situations that can cause hair loss include hormonal changes, poor diet and nutritional deficiencies, a variety of medications, surgery, and many medical conditions, but noticeably, thyroid disease.
Diet definitely influences hormonal output, and diets that lead to systemic inflammation may also lead to the upregulation of DHT at inflammatory tissue sites and thereby contribute to pattern hair thinning. But in general, I think that diet-driven hair loss from low-carb mostly comes from under-eating calories. This often results in hypothyroid symptoms, excessive shedding, cold extremities, etc. The mechanical stimulation exercises in the book, plus the dietary changes you’ve already made (getting enough calories and carbs) should help turn things around. But if not, let me know and we can continue to troubleshoot until your hair is back to where you want it.
Zinc is an essential element to our well-being. It acts as a catalyst in about 100 different enzyme reactions required by our body, and is involved in DNA synthesis, immune function, protein synthesis, and cell division. It is required for proper sense of taste and smell, detoxification, wound healing, and thyroid function. And it’s critical for hair growth!
fatigue, insomnia, chronic pain, headaches, migraines, anxiety, depression, weight gain, joint inflammation, gastrointestinal issues (constipation or diarrhea), tendonitis, bursitis, low libido, fibromyalgia, irritability, anger, fidgety, nervous, addictions, obsessive, frequent urination, heart disease, blood pressure problems, light-headedness, and dizziness upon rising from a bed or chair
AK- Thyroid tissue can regenerate, but the rate at which it does is not always predictable. Thus, some are able to stop the autoimmune attack on their thyroid and regain normal thyroid function. Others can reduce the dose of medications, and others will need to stay on the medications indefinitely. I’m currently working on some protocols to help with tissue regeneration.
We've read around and it seems like it could be any number of things. Our current plan is to bump up green vegetables (like spinach, kale, and brocolli) and to add more protein (we're wondering if she hit fat too hard and protein too little). We're also considering swapping the vitamins to add Biotin into the mix because it seems to have fantastic hair and nail reviews.
Adaptive physiology is a concept that suggests that our bodies develop autoimmune conditions as a protective measure to conserve energy when resources are low. One example would be the body not getting the nutrition it needs, either from a compromised digestive tract or restricted calorie or nutrient intake, causing the thyroid gland to sense danger and down regulate the body’s metabolism to conserve resources.
Uggghh. I was also using coconut oil based shampoo and conditioner. I was told to stop using these, saw some results within a week or two, it has slowed down a little. Don’t use a protein shampoo or any of those products. Im just over a year keto and it seems to be slowing down. I hope to regain some in next 6 months. This is a normal occurance from what I have been reading. It sucks but it happens with most dietary changes that are moderate to drastic in change. As long as you can’t see my scalp up front, I will still be keto. If it keeps thinning, I will try a hair rejuve sYstem. Hang in there ladies. I wanted to try some sugar free jello but the artificial sweetners turn me off a bit now days. 
For instance, a paleo protocol can technically include a pound of potatoes or a dozen fruits daily – both of which will net you 300-500 grams of carbohydrates and keep you out of the “low” range. Conversely, a low-carb diet can also not be paleo. It’s possible to limit carbohydrates but still eat grains occasionally. These definitions all depend on your set restrictions within a low-carb diet.
I am a 63 year-old woman with Hashimotos. I take Levoxyl 100 mcg M-F and 112 mcg on weekends. I also have Type 2 diabetes that is being controlled with diet and exercise. I have chronic hives and angioedema so must take 10 mg Zyrtec daily. I have had GI issues in the past…I have occasional bouts of severe nausea, diarrhea and vomiting (happens 1x per year or sometimes I go a couple of years) …when that happens I also have uncontrollable shaking and I end up in the ER from the pain, nausea and dehydration. I have seen a GI specialist and an allergist and they have no clue as to why this happens. Now, I also have a low ferritin level 5.5 and because I have not been able to tolerate oral iron they want to infuse Iron 1x per week for 5 weeks to get my level up. I am reluctant to do this as I have always been anemic and have had an infusion in the past which caused so many side effects, My last T4 was 1.01. My TSH was 0.118. I just ordered your book, but would like your thoughts. Thank you!
Physical stress alone can’t single-handedly trigger hereditary hair loss. This type of hair loss is dictated by age, hormones and genetics, and may be slightly affected by factors like diet and lifestyle. If you’ve got the hair loss gene encoded into your very DNA, it’s unlikely that a one-off traumatic event will be enough to trigger hair thinning consistent with hereditary hair loss.
Specifically in hypothyroidism the body’s ability to regenerate cells is slowed and a characteristic symptom of having lost your hair due to this thyroid condition is the loss of hair on the outer edge of your eyebrows. This is known as the “Queen Anne’s sign” based on a portrait of Anne of Denmark, (1574-1619), James 1st Queens Consort, although it is not clear that she was ever hypothyroid!

Hi! I’m 26 year old, girl and in the past 5 years I have experienced symptoms fluctuating from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid (i believe). Weight changes are around +/- 5kg therefore from 59 kg to maximum 64 kg. I have periods when I am more active, need less sleep, even when I try sleeping it’s just taking a long time to actually fall asleep. And on the contrary period when I feel very tired and sleepy. I don’t take any thyroid medicine, only multivitamins and trying to relax and do sports. I am not a big fan of drugs in general therefore I would prefer to do everything in power to help myself on a more natural, simple basis. Recently I am experiencing a lot of hair loss and started doing a little bit of research. I haven’t seen a endocrinologist doctor but I think it’s just the time to do it. Do you have any advise?

There's this guy George Blackburn who researched very low calorie diets, or protein sparing modified fasts, which is like a low-calorie version of keto. He said that he found that telogen effluvium is associated with negative nitrogen balance and that it stopped when nitrogen balance was corrected. In his letter to the editor I linked to above, he recommends higher protein intake. But being a researcher in the field, he also would have been knowledgeable of the role potassium plays in muscle preservation, and of the role sodium plays in retaining potassium. His subjects would have also received plenty of both sodium and potassium.


Collagen is the most abundant protein in your body found in your skin, hair, bones, and tendons. Our body produces less and less of it as we age. I’ve long read about the benefits, including improved skin and nails and even pain reduction, of replenishing our depleting collagen stores with a form easily assimilated by the human body including hydrolyzed collagen and gelatin. I became particularly interested in collagen for hair loss when I read about a study published in Science in 2016. It all started with investigating the hair follicle stem cells of mice where researchers discovered that age-related DNA damage triggers the destruction of a protein called Collagen 17A1. The hair follicles of older people then convert themselves into skin cells, and over time baldness ensues. Think of the image of each hair follicle on your head disappearing leaving behind bare skin one at a time and on and on. My favorite brand is Vital Proteins Collagen Peptides grass-fed and pasture-raised.
Does fatigue drag you down day after day? Do you have brain fog, weight gain, chills, or hair loss? Or is the opposite true for you: Are you often revved up, sweaty, or anxious? Your thyroid gland could be to blame. This great regulator of body and mind sometimes goes haywire, particularly in women. Getting the right treatment is critical to feel your best and avoid serious health problems.
An unexplained change in weight is one of the most common signs of a thyroid disorder. Weight gain may signal low levels of thyroid hormones, a condition called hypothyroidism. In contrast, if the thyroid produces more hormones than the body needs, you may lose weight unexpectedly. This is known as hyperthyroidism. Hypothyroidism is far more common.
Certain other classes of medication may also promote hair loss. More common among them are certain blood thinners and the blood-pressure drugs known as beta-blockers. Other drugs that might cause hair loss include methotrexate (used to treat rheumatic conditions and some skin conditions), lithium (for bipolar disorder), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen, and possibly antidepressants.

Various health conditions can lead to hair loss, but in some cases, thyroid problems are to blame. Evidence shows that endocrine disorders including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and parathyroid disorders can cause hair loss. While many other symptoms are usually characteristic either for hyper- or hypothyroidism, hair loss can occur in both. It’s not just scalp hair that is affected, but the hair on other parts of your body including eyebrows. Of course, for most people loss of scalp and facial hair is a major confidence blow.


For TE sufferers – I think that because there’s evidence to suggest that stress is one of (if not the) major triggers, then resolving diet + lifestyle become that much more important. It’s my belief that for TE sufferers, diet and lifestyle come first, then the mechanical stimulation exercises. I’ve seen some remarkable recoveries from TE, and if you’re dealing with TE + male pattern baldness, the combined approach could be very helpful.
5-Alpha Reductase Aerobic Anaerobic Androgen Receptors Blood Flow Blood Work Calcification Chronic Cardio Cortisol Dermarolling DHT Diet Dutasteride Estrogen Exercise Fibrosis Finasteride Free Testosterone Galea Theory Gravity Theory Hair loss Hair Transplant hGH Hormone Replacement Therapy Hypothyroidism Massage Oxygen Propecia Pumpkin Seed Oil Rogaine Rosemary Oil Saw Palmetto Skull Expansion Theory Sleep Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Sprinting Systemic Inflammation Testosterone Testosterone:Estrogen Thyroid Veganism Vitamin B12 Vitamin D Walking Yoga
Hair loss can also result from being UNDERtreated...not being at the right TSH, or not taking the right drugs for you. My doctor believes that a TSH of around 1 - 2 is optimal for most people to feel well and avoid having hypothyroid or hyperthyroid symptoms such as hair loss. (Note that these levels are kept lower for thyroid cancer patients to prevent cancer recurrence.) This was anecdotal information, until recently, when experts determined that values above TSH of 3 are considered hypothyroid. To understand UNDERtreated hypothyroidism better, you might want to read my book, which looks at your next steps -- including defining the "normal" range with your doc, antibody testing, TRH testing, and drugs beyond T4 therapy -- and where to find a doctor to help.
*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Information on this site is provided for informational purposes only, it is not meant to substitute medical advice provided by your physician or any other medical professional. You should not use the information contained on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem, disease, or prescribing any medication. Please read product label before use. Best results are only achieved when combined with diet and exercise program. Results not typical for any or all claims.
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