Wow! My new ND just told me about your protocol at my first visit today and I looked up your website and I REALLY hope this will work for me; but how to I do this when I’m already taking T3? In Nov I was on Armour but felt bad; found I had high Reverse T3, so began T3 and quickly raised to 50 mcg with daily average temps staying in mid-97s and low 98’s; occasionally reached 98.6. In mid-Feb, I actually felt my Reverse T3 clear and got up to 75 mcg T3 in an effort to raise my temps; now have been at 75 mcg for 3 months and temps now in mid-98’s but fluctuate. What should I do next? Keep at 75 mcg and just keep tracking temps? Go up or down on T3 dose to see what my temps are? I also have genetic polymorphisms for poor detox and vitamin absorption (COMT, MTHFR, VDR, etc).
Besides that, an underactive thyroid gland affects the way your body breaks down the proteins that you eat on a daily basis. This is important in the growth of hair because the hair germinates from the proteins. Additionally, in this condition, your stomach acid levels drop and in this case, you will not be able to absorb and make use of the minerals and vitamins that are important for your hair growth.

Collagen is a protein containing a high volume of amino acids such as glutamine that supports hair strength, skin elasticity, bone and joint health, and proper gut balance. Collagen production declines as the body ages and in the presence of chronic health conditions. Supplementing with collagen to alleviate reduced levels may improve hair growth and provide exceptional benefits for those with thyroid-related hair loss.

I was on Keto for about 3 months (dec – feb). Am in Canada since Nov’17 and it was extreme winter while I was on Keto. This is my first winter and hence it was new to my body (i mean hair). The hair loss was major and it was very depressing. I would lose about 25-50 strands of hair (am not even kidding) each time I run my hand through my hair. Washing my hair became a nightmare. I decided to consult a doctor. He said it might be due to iron deficiency and suggested a blood test. The test revealed high uric acid in my blood and that scared me even more and eventually I stopped my Keto.

5-Alpha Reductase Aerobic Anaerobic Androgen Receptors Blood Flow Blood Work Calcification Chronic Cardio Cortisol Dermarolling DHT Diet Dutasteride Estrogen Exercise Fibrosis Finasteride Free Testosterone Galea Theory Gravity Theory Hair loss Hair Transplant hGH Hormone Replacement Therapy Hypothyroidism Massage Oxygen Propecia Pumpkin Seed Oil Rogaine Rosemary Oil Saw Palmetto Skull Expansion Theory Sleep Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) Sprinting Systemic Inflammation Testosterone Testosterone:Estrogen Thyroid Veganism Vitamin B12 Vitamin D Walking Yoga

Great questions, and the reality is that much of this is speculation! I think, by far, my biggest issue going low-carb was that I always felt relatively satiated, and as a result, I under-ate constantly. The end-result was 1) a decrease in thyroid functionality and an increase in hair shedding, and 2) the revelation of just how easy this is to do going low-carb.


Nutrient deficiencies are an issue for me personally. I supplement every day to maintain my nutrients at optimum. When I noticed a worsening of my hair loss last year, nutrient testing revealed that I was deficient in all those nutrients necessary for hair health. This high quality multivitamin Pure Encapsulations PureLean Pure Pack (it helped me lose a few pounds too) which includes the healthy fat omega-3 has made a world of difference. I also like Pure Encapsulations Energize Plus Pure Pack for a boost of energy but it often sells out. 

Very interesting article and experiment. My only concern is that you combined two similar yet significantly different “diets”. While Paleo and Keto are both low carb, Keto is high fat, moderate protein, and low carb. While they are on your food list, you make no mention of increasing your daily intake of healthy fats (avocado, cream, butter, etc.). Many of the fruits and vegetables on your list are also incredibly high in carbs. At what point did you notice the signs of ketosis (dropping pounds isn’t an indicator)? Did you confirm you were in ketosis with even the less than perfect urine test strips or the better fingersticks? And the keto flu occurs in the first 3-10 days during adaptation, it wouldn’t have struck weeks later unless that is when you finally entered ketosis.
In my personal opinion, I’d much rather eat too much protein (and get kicked out of ketosis), than eat too little and suffer the consequences from protein deficiency. How much protein should you eat? Opinions vary, but on average you should have at least 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight. 90 grams of protein for a person who weighs 180 would be a safe number almost on the high side (we don’t need as much protein as we think).
Hello Dr. Wilson, I had the right half of my thyroid removed in 2012. I started taking spirolactone in 2013 for severe cystic acne and the synthroid in 2014 0.1 MG. This year, I started taking T3. When I started taking the synthroid, I started having excessive hair loss like FPB. When I started taking the T3 (10 mcg per day) my hair line started to grow back in. I also had some hair to regrow. Now my hair growth is at a stand still. In some places, I have some scarring. I also had a biopsy. The dermatologist told me to use Rogaine for women 5% and doxycycline for imflammation. My last labs in May 2015 were t4 -1.1,T3- 1.4 and TSH- 0.86. My hair growth is stagnant. I have also started to have severe sweating from the neck up and red hot ears. However, I’m not hot just sweaty even in very cold temperatures. My PCP says my labs are fine so no need to change meds. I no longer have hair loss but no real growth in the crown, hairline, etc. However, every where else, my hair has grown to shoulder length. I’m so confused.
To mimic a starvation state effectively, each patient must be as near to his or her ideal body weight as possible; therefore, we frequently plan for weight loss in our patients. Twenty-seven (60%) of the adolescents reported a reduction in their weight during the time on the ketogenic diet; seven specifically exhibited an unintended weight loss of ≥25% of their initial body weight.
If your hair problems are a result of rapid keto weight loss, then it’s usually a couple months before things get back to normal. Biotin has been used successfully by many in this circumstance to help support their hair growth after a bout of shedding and thinning. Telogen effluvium caused by keto weight loss is a temporary annoyance that is best ignored. Hair follicles are still there waiting to sprout again, and usually do as you’ll witness from hair stubs coming in.
I too tested normal with my thyroid. However my temperature in the mornings has been very low. For example my temperature for the past three mornings were 97.5 97.2 and 96.6. I have all the classic symptoms of a thyroid disorder. My hair started falling out suddenly 5 months ago and I have lost more than half of it. (By the way I’m a 21 year old girl). I need sleep all of the time and I’m always cold not wanting the air conditioner to ever cut on while others are burning hot. I’m also depressed. My life used to be completely different. I’m actually on the way to a doctor who does think I have a thyroid problem and wants to help me. ( all other doctors just think I have telogen effluvium) I hope this doctor can help me the way you helped your patients because I really suspect this to be a thyroid problem and not just a hair loss problem.
2) Baldness as a “protective” mechanism. The tops of our scalps are relatively unused and far away from our hearts. Studies suggest that baldness may even be a precursor to heart disease. If true, it’s possible that our bodies may choose to store calcification first in places that don’t affect major arteries (the scalp sutures and vessels), then later in areas that are more important (like the capillaries and arteries in other extremities and closer to the heart).
hello doctor i am an 18 year old girl. since end of december of 2013 i started experiencing sudden increase in shedding. within march it increased greatly and i went to a dermatologist who was useless. after that i have been to nearly 76 dermatologists but all was in vain. my hairloss skyrocketed to large amounts by may and june and now also i loose about 100 after shower.my thyroid was tetted in march and tsh level was at 4.74 which was slightly higher than the range of 0.27 to 4.20. i was put on 25 mcg of thyroxine and within 2 months my tsh level came down to 1.59 and i stopped the eltroxin alltogether. yet now although my hairloss is a little less than before but still falls alot and front is very thin. hairs are just stuck in the ends and they come out when i pull them.
Abnormal hormones are often blamed for loss of scalp hair though, perhaps surprisingly, they are responsible for just a small minority of instances of this distressing symptom. Many different conditions can lead to hair loss; some hair loss is part of normal life. Women after childbirth and at the time of the menopause can lose hair and almost every man will lose some hair by the time of reaching adulthood. Elderly males and females will develop baldness of various degrees, which is largely determined by genetic factors. 

Uggghh. I was also using coconut oil based shampoo and conditioner. I was told to stop using these, saw some results within a week or two, it has slowed down a little. Don’t use a protein shampoo or any of those products. Im just over a year keto and it seems to be slowing down. I hope to regain some in next 6 months. This is a normal occurance from what I have been reading. It sucks but it happens with most dietary changes that are moderate to drastic in change. As long as you can’t see my scalp up front, I will still be keto. If it keeps thinning, I will try a hair rejuve sYstem. Hang in there ladies. I wanted to try some sugar free jello but the artificial sweetners turn me off a bit now days. 
I want you to know that there is help for your hair loss! I know how crushing it can be to deal with a symptom as difficult to disguise as hair loss, but there are so many avenues for you to explore that can lead to a huge shift in your current hair growth. As I began to get to the root cause of my own thyroid condition and make changes that restored health and balance to my body, the hair loss I was experiencing stopped. Start with the solutions that resonate the most with you and are easiest to implement, and note that it may take several weeks to see noticeable changes with any supplement, medication, dietary, or topical changes that you make.
Quick-fix stress relievers aren't just "band-aid solutions"--if you can reverse your stress response in the moment, you can minimize your experience of chronic stress.  It helps to have a somewhat comprehensive stress management plan, and techniques that act quickly are an important part of that.  Learn more about breathing exercises and other fast-acting stress relievers.
The drugs that can be used to treat the hair loss and reverse the loss include Rogaine and finasteride that prevent the effects of the DHT hormone. The drugs are taken as pills which you should take as per the prescription given by your doctor. The drugs have serious implications on childbirth and therefore should be used carefully if you are in the childbearing age.
The noticeable hair loss was a red flag for me that I needed to get to my doctor for thyroid testing. I’m on the natural desiccated thyroid Nature-throid plus a compounded time-release T3. My doctor did comprehensive testing including the essential thyroid tests TSH, Free T4, Free T3, Reverse T3, and thyroid antibodies. Turned out my Free T3 was middle of the range. I personally feel terrible when my Free T3 is low or even middle of the range. Optimal Free T3 for my body is when it reaches top quarter of the normal range, so adjusting my thyroid medication dosage was an essential piece to my thyroid hair loss. There are many different thyroid medication options. Finding a doctor open the treatment options to find what is right for you is key.
Although hair loss is a well-known symptom of thyroid disorders, there is still research ongoing. The current research focuses on hypothyroidism primarily. However, hyperthyroidism patients can also experience this unfortunate scenario due to the fact the disorder triggers telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is a form of non-scarring alopecia indicated by diffuse hair shedding. The condition is a reactive process i.e. it is caused by metabolic or hormonal stress or due to medications. Additionally, higher production of thyroid hormones can also cause hair graying, which is a common symptom of Grave’s disease.
Stress is thought to disrupt this process, prematurely kicking hairs out of the growth period. Rather than leaving anagen at their own pace, they all go through the resting phase at the same time and fall out together in bigger numbers—up to 10 times more than usual, according to the dermatologist Kurt Stenn, the author of the new book Hair: A Human History. This has been shown in mice, when the stress of being exposed to loud noises led their hairs to go into catagen prematurely.
While you take steps to lower your stress, reduce stress related hair loss by promoting hair growth and reducing hair shedding. Address hair falling out due to stress by supplementing your stress-busting techniques with a clinically proven hair growth supplement. This will help provide vitamins and minerals to the hair follicle to nourish hair growth and reduce hair loss. Maintain a healthy scalp with an invigorating hair and scalp serum, an exfoliating gentle shampoo, and a moisturizing conditioner with Argan oil and hazelnut oil. These 3 hair care products will help create the ideal environment for healthy hair growth. How to stop hair loss from stress is a combination of stress-reduction techniques plus scientifically researched hair growth and hair care solutions. This multifaceted approach is the best way to alleviate hair loss due to stress. 

AK- Thyroid tissue can regenerate, but the rate at which it does is not always predictable. Thus, some are able to stop the autoimmune attack on their thyroid and regain normal thyroid function. Others can reduce the dose of medications, and others will need to stay on the medications indefinitely. I’m currently working on some protocols to help with tissue regeneration.

Most thyroid conditions result from the immune system attacking the thyroid because the immune system is out of balance. Even when the thyroid is taken out surgically or treated with radioactive iodine the autoimmunity still persists in most cases. Many people will have their thyroids removed, and will develop new autoimmune disorders such as Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, etc. The immune system just finds a different target.
For some, a Paleo style diet that emphasizes high quality proteins and fats and limits grains, processed sugar and starchy carbohydrates can keep blood sugars lowered and stable. My Hashimoto’s survey resulted in 27 percent reporting an increase in hair growth when following a Paleo diet, with 32.6 percent noticing improvement with a strict autoimmune Paleo diet! But any diet that reduces sugar and keeps carbohydrates at a moderate level can help bring blood sugar back into balance and reduce the likelihood of hair loss.
Studies performed on animals support the theory that chronic stress is a major contributor to chronic telogen effluvium. It's thought that stress somehow changes the chemistry of the hair follicles, resulting in too many hair follicles in the resting phase at one time. But if you can reduce stress, you can restore the natural cycle and promote healthy hair growth.
Your brain (more specifically, the hypothalamus) signals your pituitary gland (a pea size master endocrine gland below the base of the brain) to produce the hormone TSH. This in turn tells the thyroid gland to makes two hormones, thyroxine ( T4 ) and triiodothyronine (T3), which are collectively called ‘thyroid hormone’. T3 and T4 ultimately control metabolism and how much energy is required by different systems in the body. The pituitary gland reads the amount of thyroid hormones in the blood stream and increases or decreases production of T3 and T4, based on the levels detected.
It may take some time to find the right dosage of thyroid hormone to get your thyroid under control. If you're uncomfortable with the look of your hair while treatment is underway, there are options to consider. Wearing a hair piece or wig or getting a new hairstyle can help camouflage hair loss as you wait for the results of thyroid treatment to begin. Ask your doctor if it makes sense to try a topical medication that helps spur hair growth like mixoxidil (Rogaine).

“The good news is that your doctor can prescribe thyroid hormone medication to help your hair grow back,” said Dr. Jennifer Landa, chief medical officer for BodyLogicMD. “The first thing that you’ll notice is a slowing of the hair loss, and then the hair will start to grow back, and ultimately it will grow thicker and stronger.  But this can take several months.”


Please note that I am not a doctor. I’m just sharing the ten things that worked for me in the hopes that you will discover what works for you too. I’ve included links to brands of supplements that I personally take in orange font. I didn’t just start taking all these supplements all at once. I always start with one supplement and try that for a few weeks and note any improvements in my symptoms or adverse reactions before introducing another supplement, and so on. As with all things in particular supplements mentioned at Hypothyroid Mom, consult with your doctor to be sure they are right for you and that you are taking the right dosage for your body. Our physiology is unique so what works for each of us will be unique too. Always consult with your doctor before taking supplements if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
Hi! I’m 26 year old, girl and in the past 5 years I have experienced symptoms fluctuating from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid (i believe). Weight changes are around +/- 5kg therefore from 59 kg to maximum 64 kg. I have periods when I am more active, need less sleep, even when I try sleeping it’s just taking a long time to actually fall asleep. And on the contrary period when I feel very tired and sleepy. I don’t take any thyroid medicine, only multivitamins and trying to relax and do sports. I am not a big fan of drugs in general therefore I would prefer to do everything in power to help myself on a more natural, simple basis. Recently I am experiencing a lot of hair loss and started doing a little bit of research. I haven’t seen a endocrinologist doctor but I think it’s just the time to do it. Do you have any advise?
Dry hair can be a cause or symptom of several things. If you are washing your hair daily, consider changing this routine to prevent washing away the essential oils on your scalp. Additionally, an underlying medical condition or nutritional deficiency may be the cause. Consult a health-care provider if you are concerned. Your doctor may want to run blood tests, such as a hormone or thyroid panel.
Demodex hair mites – sounds gross right? But there are tiny mites that live in the hair follicles of 96 to 98 percent of people that may be responsible for your hair loss, and could cause your hair to be more greasy. You can wash your hair with a sulfur and tea tree oil containing shampoo like Ovante’s Demodex to kill the mites – just remember to let the shampoo sit on your scalp for 3-5 minutes to effectively kill the mites.
I’m sure you’re familiar with the saying “you are what you eat.” However, I prefer to say, “you are what you digest and absorb!” If you have a chronic illness such as thyroid dysfunction or an autoimmune condition, you may not be fully digesting and absorbing all of the nutrients that are vital for thyroid function and healthy hair. A primary reason for this is low stomach acid, which breaks down your food once it reaches your gut.
The life of a single hair has four separate stages. The anogen phase, when your hair is actively growing, usually lasts between two and seven years. The short 10-day catagen phase is when the hair follicle shrinks and growth halts. Next is the telogen phase during which the hair rests for about three months; it stays attached to your head, but a new growth begins underneath it. The final phase is the exogen phase in which the hair finally detaches from your body and is shed. About 10 to 20 percent of your hair is in the telogen stage at any given time, while the rest is actively growing, according to the American Hair Loss Association.
Hi Sandy, here’s an update. I talked to the owner yesterday and she said you can go to their Facebook page at facebook.com/anantraskincare. She said as long as you pay for the international shipping she’s happy to send you an order to the states or wherever you may be. Also you can contact her direct by email. If you want her email address you can contact me on the contact page here and I can give you her personal email. Hope that helps have a good one!
The low levels of thyroid hormones reduce the activity and the ability of the body to regenerate cells. Iodine insufficiency in the developing world is a primary cause of hypothyroid. In the developed world, Hashimotos' disease is responsible for up to 80% of cases according to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Women are five times more likely to be diagnosed with hypothyroidism and the odds increase with age.
I have suffered hair loss for a few years now and my hair looks quite thin although no bald patches. I’m a 33 years old female of Asian descent. My mother also has thin hair but due to thyroid issues. I regularly get a blood test to make sure that I don’t inherit this condition and the thyroid tests always came back negative. Recently I’ve had a full hormones blood work done, and again, all are normal. 

Dana Trentini founded Hypothyroid Mom October 2012 in memory of the unborn baby she lost to hypothyroidism. This is for informational purposes only and should not be considered a substitute for consulting your physician regarding medical advice pertaining to your health. Hypothyroid Mom includes affiliate links including the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program. Connect with Dana on Google+


I’ve been on Keto now for almost 4 months and I’ve been losing hair every day all day like a lot that I never noticed when I was eating regular and high carb and even sugary foods. I take 10,000mg a day of biotin for about a month and so far all I can say is my nails are stronger but my hair is still falling out?!?! I’m just not sure how long it will take for my hair to stop falling out? I don’t however do carb days I do very strict Keto. I use high quality shampoos as well and.I condition my hair. Thanks
Isn't it frustrating how many doctors just don't test for antibodies? I almost think it would be the first thing you'd test for, rather than TSH. But even my endocrinologist had nothing to say about it, just said "Oh when your thyroid fails we'll give you medication." I started doing my own research and found out about the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first time I've been able to lose weight for over ten years.
The life of a single hair has four separate stages. The anogen phase, when your hair is actively growing, usually lasts between two and seven years. The short 10-day catagen phase is when the hair follicle shrinks and growth halts. Next is the telogen phase during which the hair rests for about three months; it stays attached to your head, but a new growth begins underneath it. The final phase is the exogen phase in which the hair finally detaches from your body and is shed. About 10 to 20 percent of your hair is in the telogen stage at any given time, while the rest is actively growing, according to the American Hair Loss Association.
In my personal opinion, I’d much rather eat too much protein (and get kicked out of ketosis), than eat too little and suffer the consequences from protein deficiency. How much protein should you eat? Opinions vary, but on average you should have at least 0.5 grams of protein per pound of body weight. 90 grams of protein for a person who weighs 180 would be a safe number almost on the high side (we don’t need as much protein as we think).
While eating a diet rich in these nutrients is an important step in maintaining your levels of each, the unfortunate fact is that our soil has been depleted of nutrients and our food is less nutrient-dense than our parents’ and grandparents’. That’s why I recommend for everyone to take a high-quality multivitamin each day. I recently developed and released a custom-formulated multivitamin specially designed to provide all of the essential nutrients for thyroid function and general health. It includes all of the vitamins and minerals listed above in their most bio-available and easily absorbable forms.
1. Nina van Beek, Enikő Bodó, Arno Kromminga, Erzsébet Gáspár, Katja Meyer, Michal A. Zmijewski, Andrzej Slominski, Björn E. Wenzel, Ralf Paus. “Thyroid Hormones Directly Alter Human Hair Follicle Functions: Anagen Prolongation and Stimulation of Both Hair Matrix Keratinocyte Proliferation and Hair Pigmentation.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 93, Issue 11, 1 November 2008, Pages 4381–4388.
. . . evening primrose oil (also known as EPO) is a nutritional supplement that is frequently mentioned. In his book, Solved: The Riddle of Illness, Stephen Langer, M.D. points to the fact that symptoms of essential fatty acid insufficiency are very similar to hypothyroidism, and recommends evening primrose oil -- an excellent source of essential fatty acids -- as helpful for people with hypothyroidism. The usefulness of evening primrose oil, particularly in dealing with the issues of excess hair loss with hypothyroidism, was also reinforced by endocrinologist Kenneth Blanchard. According to Dr. Blanchard:
I often get confused about hyper and hypothyroidism. My TSH level fluctuates a LOT. It was 10.7 last week. And my body weight in 52kg (I am 25yrs old). My doctor suggested me a change in dose. I was taking 75mcg of thyronorm earlier. I now take 88mcg. But even after I changed my dose, my hair loss is like crazy. I lose bunches every single time I brush/shower. How am I to confirm if the dose is correct? She just used my weight to calculate the dose. Does that work? My TSH levels aren’t a factor? What do I do to get my hair back?

As someone who has had a few periods of extensive hair loss since I became hypothyroid (at one point, my hair was so thin that if you held it together and made a ponytail, it was the width of a PENCIL!!), I can vouch for the fact that taking EPO was the only thing that calmed it down. It not only slowed, then stopped my hair loss over about two months, but new hair grew back, and my hair was no longer straw-like, dry and easily knotted. When I take EPO, I usually take Source Naturals Evening Primrose Oil, which I get from Iherb.com (see left), which is 1350 mg. I usually take 1 to 2 per day.

Furthermore, stress affects our immune system, making us more susceptible to illness. Like diet, general health is closely linked to hair health, with the flu, high fevers and systemic upsets often triggering hair loss approximately two months later. Stress can also trigger dandruff in individuals who are prone to it - and research is increasingly showing that flaky/itchy scalps can worsen or lead to hair loss.
Biotin is a very popular supplement recommended by many doctors, pharmacists, health food stores, TV shopping channels, health websites and more when it comes to hair loss. To find some of the best supplement brands for me to try in my quest for thyroid wellness, combing the internet for customer reviews of various brands has been an important part of my process. I’ve read mixed reviews about biotin. Some users love biotin and others find no improvement or they complain about adverse reactions like acne breakout. Biotin didn’t make a significant difference for me but it might work for you and some brands get incredible reviews like this one.
I switched to Klaire Labs Ther-Biotic Powder after taking Metagenics Ultra Flora Balance for about 8 years. (I had no idea you were supposed to alternate different kinds). The Ther-Biotic was ok at first then created bad blood sugar issues. I felt weak and my arms felt tingly every time I ate like you do before you vomit. The feeling almost completely stopped after I ran out of the Ther-Biotic. Now I am experiencing with that same symptom every single time I try to take any kind of probiotic, so I am not taking any. I also get nauseous if I try to drink lemon water or eat fermented vegetables. Have I damaged my stomach lining? What should I do?
Furthermore, stress affects our immune system, making us more susceptible to illness. Like diet, general health is closely linked to hair health, with the flu, high fevers and systemic upsets often triggering hair loss approximately two months later. Stress can also trigger dandruff in individuals who are prone to it - and research is increasingly showing that flaky/itchy scalps can worsen or lead to hair loss.
If you suspect you may have thyroid trouble – especially if someone in your family has been diagnosed – your primary care physician can use a simple blood test to assess your thyroid function. Depending on your diagnosis, you have many treatment options. The experts at the USC Caruso Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery are continually researching new treatments and therapies for thyroid conditions.
I switched to Klaire Labs Ther-Biotic Powder after taking Metagenics Ultra Flora Balance for about 8 years. (I had no idea you were supposed to alternate different kinds). The Ther-Biotic was ok at first then created bad blood sugar issues. I felt weak and my arms felt tingly every time I ate like you do before you vomit. The feeling almost completely stopped after I ran out of the Ther-Biotic. Now I am experiencing with that same symptom every single time I try to take any kind of probiotic, so I am not taking any. I also get nauseous if I try to drink lemon water or eat fermented vegetables. Have I damaged my stomach lining? What should I do?

The reason of the hair loss may related with factors other than genetic like connective tissue disorders, stress, anemia, lupus, medications, hormonal and seasonal changes, nutritional problems, severe diets, bulimia, protein/calorie deficiency, zinc and essential amino-acid deficiency, mal-absorption (intestinal and digestive problems), A-vitamin excess, general anesthesia, affective mood disorders.So you have to have a full exam with an hair surgeon, internalist and/or endocrinologist to find out any reason for hair loss.


Hello Sir, i am 27 years old male. My TSH is 2.93, and free t4 & t3 are well within the normal range. At present daily I am taking eltroxine 75 MCG & meconerv plus . I am eating too much foods,milk & fruits. After this also there is no increase in the weight. But, I want to put on weight. I always feels lack of energy after working for two hours. Could you please suggest me , how to put weight.
Certain other classes of medication may also promote hair loss. More common among them are certain blood thinners and the blood-pressure drugs known as beta-blockers. Other drugs that might cause hair loss include methotrexate (used to treat rheumatic conditions and some skin conditions), lithium (for bipolar disorder), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including ibuprofen, and possibly antidepressants.
Christina- Thyroid tissue can regenerate, but the rate at which it does is not always predictable. Thus, some are able to stop the autoimmune attack on their thyroid and regain normal thyroid function. Others can reduce the dose of medications, and others will need to stay on the medications indefinitely. I’m currently working on some protocols to help with tissue regeneration.
It is a well-established fact that endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and parathyroid disorders can cause hair loss. In thyroid dysfunction, other than scalp hair, hair on other parts of the body may also be affected, such as eyebrows and body hair. Diffuse hair loss is sometimes the presenting symptom of hypothyroidism.[1] It is well-known that thyroid hormone is essential for the development and maintenance of the hair follicle. Trichograms from the parietal and occipital areas in a study showed increased dysplastic and broken hairs strengthening the view that alopecia in thyroid disease is not caused by changes within hair cycle, but probably by impaired hair quality.[2]
Eva – thank you for sharing your journey. I understand how frustrating this can be. While I only work with patients with Hashimoto’s, oftentimes patients will have additional autoimmune conditions. Most autoimmune conditions have common root causes, and a lot of times the things that are recommended for one autoimmune condition will help with others. Conditions that I have found to respond really well to the Hashimoto’s protocols have been rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, eczema, asthma, Graves’, premature ovarian failure, psoriasis, Alopecia Areata, and Sjogrens. I have also seen the protocols help with Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, PCOS, as well as Type 2 diabetes, Crohn’s, and Ulcerative colitis.
Sex hormone testing revealed that my estrogen levels were declining and that was making a mess of my hair. Another common sex hormone imbalance is estrogen dominance, too much estrogen relative to progesterone. Don’t forget testosterone testing too…yes high testosterone can cause hair loss but so can low testosterone. Harvard-trained MD Dr. Sara Gottfried had this to say about testosterone in her article The Horrors of Hair Loss for The Huffington Post:
First things first, Anabel explained that hair loss is a very common problem for women – much more so that people realise. "Research shows that at least 1 in 3 women will suffer from hair loss or reduced hair volume at some point in their lifetime". So if you are losing strands, it's important not to freak out, your mane will recover. In the meantime, here's everything you need to know...
Nutrient deficiencies are a common issue for those of us with hypothyroidism. Not only are nutrients essential for thyroid function, but they also play an important role in keeping the hair on our heads from falling. A good quality multi-vitamin is important and of course a healthy diet is essential, but still nutrient testing is important because many like me will require additional supplementation to bring us to optimal. Testing should include iodine, zinc, selenium, vitamin D, B12, and magnesium.
There I was, standing in front of my bathroom mirror brushing my hair, when I noticed chunks of it coming out on my hair brush. It was horrifying and depressing, after all I was 32 years old and this was not normal! I would later discover that this was a symptom of my Graves’ Disease, and I would even have the misfortune of experiencing it again during my thyroid treatment. While thyroid hair loss might not be one of the more dangerous symptoms of thyroid dysfunction, it can be one of the more disheartening, and it was a constant reminder that something was not right with my body.
Most people with hypo- or hyper-thyroidism have autoimmune thyroid disease. If a person has one autoimmune disease he/she is more likely than others to develop some other autoimmune condition. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune condition that causes hair loss that occurs in people with autoimmune thyroid disease more often than expected by chance. Unlike the types of diffuse hair loss described above, alopecia areata causes discrete, often circular, areas of hair loss. In most cases this is transient and does not progress, but unfortunately it can cause significant baldness. There are other rare autoimmune conditions that can cause hair loss through scarring (e.g. lupus erythematosus), which are associated with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is also associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and may manifest as diffuse hair loss; other features are irregular periods, obesity and acne.
The first thing I did was to go looking for a few scientific papers on the phenomenon and they are very tough to find.  The only one I can see where hair loss is suggested as a side-effect of Keto was The Ketogenic Diet: Adolescents Can Do It, Too, an incredibly interesting paper where teenaged epileptics were put on a Ketogenic diet to see what would happen to the frequency of their seizures.  While it appears that the results were overwhelmingly positive, in the side effects section, we get this paragraph:
hello doctor i am an 18 year old girl. since end of december of 2013 i started experiencing sudden increase in shedding. within march it increased greatly and i went to a dermatologist who was useless. after that i have been to nearly 76 dermatologists but all was in vain. my hairloss skyrocketed to large amounts by may and june and now also i loose about 100 after shower.my thyroid was tetted in march and tsh level was at 4.74 which was slightly higher than the range of 0.27 to 4.20. i was put on 25 mcg of thyroxine and within 2 months my tsh level came down to 1.59 and i stopped the eltroxin alltogether. yet now although my hairloss is a little less than before but still falls alot and front is very thin. hairs are just stuck in the ends and they come out when i pull them.
The only help I can offer you is the information on the web site. I can offer the information that a low temperature can contribute to such symptoms and that they can often be corrected with proper treatment. If you are suicidal I encourage you to contact a doctor, a hospital, or law enforcement officers that can help you through your crisis so that you can keep looking for the help and answers you need to feel better. Best wishes
I’m 31, Diagnosed with PCOS 6 years ago and have been battling hair loss for almost 5 years now. My thyroid tests are normal every time it gets checked. My Iron is just fine. Since all I’ve seen are lousy endocrinologists, I continue on with hair loss and thinning. No doctor can find out whats going on or if its the PCOS or fails to see it as an issue. I’m at a complete loss for help as my Insecurity about hair keeps growing. I have found that using Nioxin hair products help it to look thicker but does not stop it from falling out. Any suggestions would be appreciated…. wasting my money on seeing more doctors would be my last resort.
Some general dietary advice that not only speaks to general health but is thyroid specific includes avoiding where possible artificial chemicals and toxins found in processed foods. It is not the single serving that is the issue but long term accumulation and ingestion that can impede thyroid function, a classic example of this is mercury. Because mercury is chemically similar to iodine the thyroid will store it and it can potentially trigger a thyroid autoimmune disease such as Graves' or Hashimoto's.
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